Reviews

The feral and wacko cast of ‘Saturday’s Voyeur’

Thanks to the plethora of sometimes inane (OK, mostly) markers added to Utah’s culture and politics over the last year, playwrights Allen Nevins and Nancy Borgenicht have scribed a truly delightful Saturday’s Voyeur. And thanks in large part to the brilliance of the entire cast, and direction by Cynthia Fleming, Voyeur 2011 should go down as one of Salt Lake Acting Company’s best productions.

Of course it takes the whole kit-and-kaboodle to make an inspired and great production, from the writing to the costumes and lighting, and the music to the acting and the design, all of which is attributed here, but I’m focusing on the cast because … well, as a litter, they’re playful and cute and because each individual is, or at least was on opening night, simply sensational.

Austin Archer as the queeniest Patrick Henry, a U.S. Founding Father, I’ve had the pleasure of ever seeing is fabulous … although in reflection I may have never witnessed a gay Patrick Henry, especially one frolicking across a stage wielding a quill a little too limp-wristed. Then you throw Archer into the role of Republican Utah senator, Michael Wadd (Waddoups), with such bias and bloating superiorism that one can only feel exceptionally proud to be a Democrat … or even a ghastly Tea Party member.

Alexis Baigue in bicycle shorts is nothing less than waaaahhhh! Add to that, Baigue portraying Mayor Ralph Becker, as the real Pecker … I mean Becker sits in the audience, with great pride and stoicism warms the shackles of the heart. Then your throw Baigue into the role of Republican Utah representative, Curtis Yo-Duh (Oda), with such humane diligence that one can only be proud for finally buying a gun license. Throw into the mix Baigue as Alexander Hamilton, a U.S. Founding Father, and one can only wish that he looked as good in a colonial wig.

Randall Eames, a Voyeur virgin, revolutionizes our third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson. Plus he looks mighty fine frocked in Missionary attire and grass skirt.

Steven Fehr, as Utah’s current favorite villain Gayle Bazooka (Ruzicka), pretty much steals the scene, when he’s draped in red garb and honing a pair of devil’s horns, singing MC Hammer’s “U Can’t Touch This.” And trust me, once one catches a glimspe of Bazooka’s paunchy lower region, one won’t want to touch it. Fehr’s portrayal of Benjamin Franklin is electrifying and enlightening. Fehr opened my eyes to HB477, as he is John Doodle (Dougall), the Republican Utah representative who sponsored GRAMA. I just assumed it was a bill to allow open enrollment to Shady Pines.

Holly Fowers as the Cat Lady is totally in the bag. I love her, as do the residents of Bountiful City, apparently.

Kent Harrison Hayes rides an invisible horse like nobody’s business … go Paul Revere! Plus Hayes’ role as Orrin Snatch (Hatch) will take one unwillingly back to Bazooka’s paunched lower region.

Kelsie Jepsen as Carl Dwimmer (Wimmer) is prettier in person, and three times the man … even without the Browning automatic pistol.

Jacob Johnson’s role as Steve Sandstorm (Sandstrom) is so awesome it should be considered illegal. Then putting Johnson into Governor Sherbert’s (Herbert) pants is a real sweet treat.

Shannon Musgrave plays Betsy Ross with such fantastic humor and animation that one can’t help but salute her. However, I can’t comment on her portrayal of Kate Kopischke, the unofficial first lady of Salt Lake City, because I had been under the impression that the first lady was Proactiv spokeswoman Julianne Hough.

Victoria Elena Nones plays Becky Blockhart (Lockhart), Utah’s first woman Speaker of the House … again, Julianne Hough? But thankfully Nones is a much better actress.

Jeanette Puhich plays a believable Wife, since she is one in real life (and her biggest fan is her cute-ass husband). She’s also sensational as a KSL Reporter, no sensationalism here.

John Rowland as Ronald Reagan is unforgettable, and that’s a major feat.

SLAC’s Saturday’s Voyeur 2011 reminds us of how far we have not come since becoming a State of the Union in 1896, and how our State of the Union has been stomping on the declarations of 1776, but it’s so fucking wacko that it’s worth the reminder.

Voyeur runs through Sep. 4, saltlakeactingcompany.org.

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